Antonín dvořák* dvorak·/ slovak radio symphony orchestra* csr symphony orchestra·- ondrej lenárd* ond - Category:Dvořák, Antonín - IMSLP/Petrucci Music Library.


Dvořák accepted Thurber’s offer and moved to the United States in 1892, but he was uncomfortable in the urban American setting, and he disliked being absent from his homeland. His new address of 327 East 17th Street in New York City seemed a poor substitute for the rolling hills of Bohemia. Thus, Dvořák terminated his contract after three years to return to Prague .

The youthful Dvořák studied organ, violin, piano and - less successfully - the German language. He played viola in the Bohemian Provisional Theatre Orchestra, performing in restaurants and at balls. In 1871, he resigned from the orchestra to concentrate on composing, scraping a living by teaching the piano.

By that time, Dvorák was among the most celebrated of European composers, seen by many as the heir to Brahms , who had championed Dvorák during the younger composer's long climb to the top. The son of a butcher and occasional zither player, Dvorák studied the organ in Prague as a young man and worked variously as a café violist and church organist during the 1860s and 1870s while creating a growing body of symphonies, chamber music, and Czech-language opera. For three years in the 1870s he won a government grant (the Viennese critic Hanslick was among the judges) designed to help the careers of struggling young creative artists. Brahms gained for Dvorák a contract with his own publisher, Simrock, in 1877; the association proved a profitable one despite an initial controversy that flared when Dvorák insisted on including Czech-language work titles on the printed covers, a novelty in those musically German-dominated times. In the 1880s and 1890s Dvorák's reputation became international in scope thanks to a series of major masterpieces that included the Seventh, Eighth, and "New World" symphonies. At the end of his life he turned to opera once again; Rusalka, from 1901, incorporates Wagnerian influences into the musical telling of its legend-based story, and remains the most frequently performed of the composer's vocal works. Dvorák, a professor at Prague University from 1891 on, exerted a deep influence on Czech music of the twentieth century; among his students was Josef Suk, who also became his son-in-law.


Antonín Dvořák* Dvorak·/ Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra* CSR Symphony Orchestra·- Ondrej Lenárd* Ondrej Lenard - Symphony No. 9 Antonín Dvořák* Dvorak·/ Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra* CSR Symphony Orchestra·- Ondrej Lenárd* Ondrej Lenard - Symphony No. 9 Antonín Dvořák* Dvorak·/ Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra* CSR Symphony Orchestra·- Ondrej Lenárd* Ondrej Lenard - Symphony No. 9 Antonín Dvořák* Dvorak·/ Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra* CSR Symphony Orchestra·- Ondrej Lenárd* Ondrej Lenard - Symphony No. 9

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